SHOW AND TELL

Bring a thing to put things in.

Topic: Biomes Forests/Wetlands

What about forests and wetlands

The value is frugality, which means not to waste anything.

For manners we’ll learn how to report peer behavior, how to apologize, and how to disagree.

Outside we’ll play bridge across the river, box bowling, and Can you do what I do?

The songs we’ll be singing are Ants Go Marching, It’s a Small World, This Land Is Your Land, Mr. Sun, and You Are My Sunshine.

Our art activities are biome wall hanging, pasta creatures, floating art.

Creative dramatics will be animal charades.

For motor development we’ll build flexibility with swinging arms. For body development, we’ll work on bilaterality with skier, rolling game, balloon bump, and parachute.

WHEREWITH HOPE? WHEREWITH JOY?

Jim Delisle, Ph.D., has taught children for more than forty years. He posted one of his articles on Free Spirit Publishing. At the end of a school year with middle school students, he closed with this:

“We’ve shared a great year,” I began, “and even though I’ll see you again next year, you and I will never again be us. So, in parting, I have two questions I’d like you to answer:

  1. What gives you hope?
  2. What gives you joy?

Write quietly. You have ten minutes.”

I waited anxiously, wondering if I’d get cardboard drivel or tender prose. You decide. Here are some of their responses.

It gives me hope when . . .

  • I see a friend succeeding in something I helped them with.
  • I think of my parents still being alive when I am an adult.
  • I see a very biased person change his mind.
  • I see my mother going through so much and still being strong and never hanging her head in shame.
  • I see that only a few girls have someone to dance with them.
  • I see my grandmother and she still remembers who I am.
  • I see that another meal is on the table.
  • My mom says “see you later” instead of goodbye.

It gives me joy when . . .

  • I make a baby laugh.
  • I finish a good book and see the world from the eyes of a character in it.
  • I feel the hot summer air and know that my season of freedom has just begun.
  • People give me the kindness I deserve rather than treating me as if I am not popular.
  • I read Maya Angelou’s poem “Phenomenal Woman.”
  • I hear preschoolers singing their ABC’s.
  • My brother gives me a ride to school happily, with no complaints.
  • I wake up on a summer morning, greeted by the sun, and realize that this day has the potential to be the best one of my life.

As my students read their statements, one to the next, a hush even more powerful than the energy of a school year’s last day embraced us all. For one last time, we were together; we were a class. When the last statement was read, one of my students said, “Great ending, Mr. D.”

“No, Dan,” I corrected him, “A great beginning.”

What can you make of these words from children not so much older than your child? I find both hope and joy. It’s a challenging time. Consider where you find your hope. Where do you find your joy? What are you role modeling for your children with these important questions?


For Your Information

Know What a Biome Is? – Our enrichment curriculum has a number of themes that deal with biomes (distinctive ecosystems). This year we’re starting with forests and wetlands. The natural world is bursting with life right now, and our children are fascinated with how all that life evolves. We’ll be talking about how rain changes a biome, what effect pollution has on a biome, and how building houses on natural land changes the biome. Talk with us if you would like to continue that learning in your home.

Classroom News

Every day Asher worked with his older classmate Kazuki on the U.S.A. puzzle, after a few days together completing the work and getting instructions from his classmate Asher completed the complex puzzle without any assistance, Asher proudly proclaimed “I did it by myself.”

“I called the Easter Bunny and he is on his way” the teacher told her students. To check if the Easter Bunny had stopped by the school, the children were taken to the backyard and then to the infant playground and they did not see any signs that the bunny had been to the school. When they got to the front yard colorful eggs covered the playground the children they dashed off to fill their Easter bags, when the older children filled their bags up they helped their younger friends find eggs.